Sunday, April 3, 2016

It's good to share // Markus Zusak

Hello everyone. So I was wandering the great interweb and found an article titled The Man Behind The Book (Thief). The author of the article attended an event where Zusak gave a speech. She shares the some of the writing tips he talked about so I thought you might want to check it out. 

I think the two points that got me the most were 1) little details and 2) be selfish. The little details in writing make all the difference. I've found that to be true both while reading and writing. The little details stick out and they make the story feel more realistic and less vague. 

Also, being selfish with your time. If you want to write, you need time. Sometimes you have to opt out of spending time with people in order to finish a book. Reading that let me know I'm doing something right (for once). Sometimes I feel guilty for hermitting myself away to write. The main title soundtrack to my life is:

"You're always hiding in your room."

I like it in my room, okay?

Also, the author linked to this video in which Zusak talks about how failure has helped him grow as a writer. Zusak is hilarious and I really related to what he was saying. I would've never guessed that he hit so many ruts in the road while writing The Book Thief. It makes me feel lot better about the plot problems in Oddball the Sequel. Like, hey, this is normal.




Have you read The Book Thief? Was there a time when a failure motivated you to do better? Do you ever make failure or fear work for you?

14 comments:

  1. I LOVE THE BOOK THIEF. Love love love love. I usually have to lock myself in the bathroom and just cry when I reach the ending. <3 (How can something so beautiful hurt so much?)

    Anyways, that's pretty brilliant advice. Description is something I really struggle with (usually my characters just talk in this black void of space) so I think using little details will help more. Like maybe the café was busy today but the coffee stains on the table had been covered up with a frayed tablecloth. (Or something.)

    Other description-y things I've been trying to do lately is to a) be more specific (was the sky blue or a fading indigo?) and b) put two words together that wouldn't usually go together. For example, the landing tasted like a mouthful of chips. (Ok that wasn't a very good example, but anyways.) "Vanilla twilight" is a good example, but it's not mine, so yeah.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The Book Thief is amazing! I really need to reread it, but that ending. It really does make me want to go and sob.

      Oh, I like your description ideas! Especially the last one. I love those unexpected combinations. :D

      Delete
  2. That`s the soundtrack of my life too, most of the things I like to do require being alone, and people are always concerned.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Exactly. I really have to be alone to create and think and people are always like, "Are you okay? Are you angry? Are you sad? What is wrong with you?"

      I'm a writer. That's what is with me. XD

      Delete
  3. He's so cute! I didn't realise he was so young, bless him. And I always forget he's Australian. It's weird hearing the writer of my favourite book actually talking.

    And only 28 when he started TBT O.o
    "No one's going to read this book". Oh, Markus ... !

    "We are the most miserable people on the planet, and we enjoy every minute of it."
    YES, MARKUS! Have you seen Little Miss Sunshine? One of the characters is a Proust scholar and he makes a speech about Proust on this topic ... Have you seen it? (I love that film.)

    But I love that about "that negative fiction gave me the courage". Sometimes I panic about writing what will sell, but then I remember that I'm not writing to sell, so I should just write what I love ... And some readers, somewhere, would love it too.

    I must reread TBT. I was thirteen when I read it, that's four years ago, I ... I JUST NEED TO REREAD IT. That is all.

    It's such an important book, though, because I think it was the first book I read and I was like "oh, THAT'S how you write a sentence!" I think I'm going to write a post about writers who've shaped me as a writer. Because there's a difference between favourite writers and influential writers.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. He is so adorable! And when he was like, "Nobody's going to read this." And guess it, everyone loves his book. It's a movie. The video really made me laugh especially the part about how we love misery. That so true! Maybe that's terrible, but if anything could be truer it's that writers love misery. XD But I have not seen that film. I'll have to look it up.

      Oh, yes. I think about that too sometimes. Just write what you love. I thinking up a post on that too. Writing what you enjoy writing about and not worrying about the hype or market, etc.

      YES! I want to reread The Book Thief so badly. But gah, there are so many books and no time.

      Oh, that sounds awesome! I would love to read that post. You're right there is a difference.

      Delete
    2. You should watch it. If only for Steve Carrell as a Proust scholar. Bless him. But yes, nothing could be truer! And I would like to read that post (about writing what you love).

      SO MANY BOOKS AND NO TIME. It's such a struggle. But maybe this summer? We shall see. It is such an important book. I may do that post. Sometimes I feel a bit lame doing lots of writing posts because I'm aware that not all my followers are writers and I don't like to seem superior-y, as in "oh and you know We Writers have Very Deep Feelings and I'm going to talk about my Journey As A Writer blah blah blah" buuut if people would enjoy it that would be great. I guess I try to balance slightly more towards book posts, which are a bit more accessible, but then on the other hand I do really enjoy reading writing posts so ... I guess I'm not making that much sense. (But we knew that.)

      Delete
    3. I never really considered that? Whether I ought post writing posts or book post. It does make sense that writing posts would limit your audience more. But really, if it's what you want to talk about then why not? Besides you do still post about books, and art, and such so I really don't think you have to worry. :)

      Delete
  4. Oh yes, I really liked that video of Markus Zusak. It's an interesting concept - failure being a good thing - but if we can use failure as a step forward, then nothing can stop us...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Exactly! Usually failure as motivation to do better next time is the best way to go about it. :)

      Delete
  5. Oh. My. Gosh. *emotions and tears* 😭
    I really loved the book thief and the film was ANAZING. Sad, solemn but amazing. It is such a beautiful story.
    I usually feel motivated by failure as I feel like I could have done better. It will make me work harder and realise that I need to concentrate and really study more. What would the world be like without failure? No one would try anything new and persevere to make something amazing work. If the first attempt failed, we would give up and never achieve as much as we can. We would never reach our full potential!
    Laila
    www.lailabee.blogspot.co.uk

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Very true! Failure as a tool instead of a letdown is the best way to go!

      The Book Thief is one of my favorites. I need to reread it.

      Delete
  6. EEEEEP. I LOVE THE BOOK THIEF SO MUCH. And also feel an immense amount of happiness that Markus Zusak is Australian. Is that weird!? *cheers for own country* AHEM. But anyway! I think it is totally encouraging when author's talk about having trouble and getting stuck. It makes me feel immensely better too. Alsoooooo I agree that details are SO important. And visual. Like sensory writing. I always feel sucked INTO the book when the writing is sensory and detailed. :')

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Me too! No, that's not really weird. If I had a favorite author who was Texan I would just love it! It makes me feel a lot better too because I'm doing that getting stuck and having to backtrack thing. I was so relieved when he shared that he had to rewrite The Book Thief so many times, especially sense it reads so effortlessly. Huzzah for the details!

      Delete

[insert witty saying about comments] And you may insert your comment below. :)